How to influence the outcome of any sales situation just by thinking about it

People tell me they hate making phone calls.

They detest public speaking.

Talking about money fills them with dread.

 

And I ask… why?

 

“Because people will think I’m a pest”, they say as they cringe.

“I just know I’m gunna mess this up”, they say with confident certainty.

“What if they think I’m not worth that much?”, they say as rejection stabs them deep in their soul.

 

Without knowing it, they have already started to influence the outcome just by thinking about it.

 

Think “pest” and through the cringing face and apologetic words that follow, you plant the idea that you are being a pest into the customer’s head. You become what you are scared of being.

Think mind blank… get mind blank.

Think, “I’m not worth that much”… and is it really a surprise when the customer agrees?

 

Dominant thoughts are top dog: Everything else follows

You see, whatever you are worried about becomes your 'dominant thought'. This quite sadistically (thanks brain) then becomes the focus, the goal of what you are trying to achieve.

Worried about being too expensive?

Brain latches on to this like a leech.

You then talk about price early on. You listen attentively for cues to confirm your belief that they think the same.

Your voice goes up nervously in question when you present the rate. You try to justify it. You offer discounts.

You believe it is too expensive so, without even trying, make them believe it too.

Expect it to happen... and there is a high chance that it will.

 

So whatever I imagine will happen... right?

This does not mean that, just by thinking it, you can make the customer sashay into the meeting wearing nothing but a thong and nipple tassels with a blank cheque between his cheeks.

It doesn’t work like that.

But when it comes to the way you communicate, the way you are perceived and the impact you have on the customer's confidence in you; your dominant thoughts are the light that shines the way.

 

So what can you do?

Before your next client interaction, follow these three points:

 

1) Ask: What am I most worried about happening?

What am I concerned about happening?

What am I expecting to happen?

Why is that?

 

2) Check your focus

Are you focused on what you want to happen?

Or what you want to avoid happening?

Is your dominant thought helping or hindering a successful interaction?

 

3) Focus on how you can help the customer

Focus on what you want to achieve not what you want to avoid.

Look at how you can help the client; how you can best serve them. If at the end of the interaction you have helped in some way and moved the customer to the next step in the sales process, it has been successful.

Expect failure and don’t be surprised when it comes knocking

Expect success and you are already half way there.

Have a great week!

Jen

CreativeMind

The "Shake-a-bom-bom" of Sales Training